Equality and equalities

Despite all the talk of prioritising poverty in Scotland, most regeneration investment is still going into wealthier areas

Despite all the talk of prioritising poverty in Scotland, most regeneration investment is still going into wealthier areas

In Scotland, all the main political parties are in theory committed to alleviation on poverty, with this year’s Holyrood election likely to see Labour and the SNP competing with one another over their respective sets of anti-poverty credentials. But, as Derek Rankine argues, regeneration investment continues to ignore the poorest areas in favour of those which arguably need the money less. 

By 3rd February 2016 0 Comments Read More →
The time is right for an audit of Scottish democracy

The time is right for an audit of Scottish democracy

Last year, we launched Democratic Audit – Scotland to provide meaningful, in depth, scrutiny of Scotland’s democratic record. The aim of the site is to provide a democratic audit, to examine the effectiveness of its political system, a democratic dashboard, to help members of the public make an informed choice when they participate in Scottish elections, and regular blog posts, to report on current developments in areas such as elections and representation, political parties, accountability, and human rights.

By 22nd January 2016 0 Comments Read More →
Has the tide turned for women’s representation in Scotland?

Has the tide turned for women’s representation in Scotland?

Scotland has a female First Minister, who competes in Holyrood with a female Leader of the Scottish Labour Party, as well as a female leader of the Scottish Conservatives. While this should be welcomed, we should not assume that the problem of women’s under representation is solved for good, and instead look at what statutory measures could do to achieve lasting positive change, argue Meryl Kenny, Fiona MacKay, and Cera Murtagh.

By 14th October 2015 0 Comments Read More →
The Government’s new EVEL timeline still isn’t sufficient to facilitate the necessary debate and deliberation

The Government’s new EVEL timeline still isn’t sufficient to facilitate the necessary debate and deliberation

In the immediate aftermath of Scotland’s vote to remain in the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister David Cameron proposed removing the rights of Scottish MPs to vote on ‘English only’ issues – a process which would be contemporaneous with the granting of new powers for Scotland. Katie Boyle argues that there are at least three main issues with the Government’s recent announcement of the way the change will be introduced, including what counts as a “devolved matter”, the financial overlap between devolved and non-devolved issues, and the break-neck speed of the process through which it was be introduced.